9 Feb 2012

Floating Frame

I bought a small picture frame recently, approx. 11" x 8" ( I think that is 28cm x 23cm or thereabouts) the trouble is when I unwrapped it I discovered it was a much paler colour than I had anticipated, and wouldn't really do for the painting I had in mind.


here you see the frame as it was unwrapped - much lighter than I thought it would have been - there was also a bit of  shine to it which does not show up on the photo





So, I got to thinking how to rescue the situation.  I decided to change the colour and  with some sandpaper I rubbed down the frame, to give it a key.   I then painted it over with some Daniel Smith Watercolor Ground - then left it to dry completely.  This Daniel Smith paint is really useful for a lot of surfaces and can be used on (and I quote from the tub itself) : Canvas, Paper, Plaster, Hardboard, non-Absorbent surfaces: Glass, Plastic and Metal.

For this next stage I used Winsor & Newton Artists Acrylic Raw Umber and with a little added water for flow covered the frame.  Painting over the Watercolour Ground made for a lovely surface and actually left what looked like the lines of wood.  I didn't worry too much if it was not all even, that added to the natural look.


almost painted - the bottom section has the Daniel Smith on it
 
 close up of the grain effect



 and here's the finished frame



 As you have no doubt guessed it is a Floating Frame, where you put the painting into the frame, use screws on the back to attach it, and when fitted makes it look as though the painting is floating within the frame.

Here's the completed painting and frame

- Lantern Hill -




With this in mind, I will use this type of frame for the large painting in yesterday's post of 
Exmoor View




16 comments:

  1. Great idea to paint the frame, Ann, why not! :) Now I see what a floating frame is. And the finished result is wonderful!

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  2. Floating frames are my favourite. Sometimes, when an oil especially is put in a tight frame I find it can look crowded.

    Isn't it odd how much of art is about sanding and turpentine?

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    1. Yes Bella, I think the same about the overcrowded paintings too.

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  3. wow that looks amazing,what a great job on that frame, I like so much what you've done with it, looks great with that BEAUTIFUL painting, wow!
    Landscapes were my pahion before my vision loss, you just do what you do sooo well!

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    1. Thanks Laurie...sorry to hear about your sight problems.

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  4. Lovely painting. Outstanding sky, now I will enjoy looking at the rest of your work.

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    1. Thanks Joan - I'm certainly busy that's for sure!

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  5. Very nice, Ann! Love the faux wood grain the Daniel Smith gives it!

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  6. You are full of good ideas Anne, thank you for the tips. Your painting will look fabulous in this frame!

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  7. Very adventurous and inventive of you! The frame looks great.
    Happy Painting,
    Nora

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    1. Thanks Nora - I must admit I was quite surprised myself how it turned out!

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